Home Canadian News Year-in-review of the events that shaped Canada’s 2018

Year-in-review of the events that shaped Canada’s 2018

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  1. Justin Trudeau’s trip to India
    Justin Trudeau’s controversial trip to India in February, and resulting costume changes, cast the prime minister in a negative light for many Canadians.
  2. Humboldt Broncos bus crash
    The April 6 bush crash involving the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League’s Humboldt Broncos killed 16 people and left a lasting impression on every family who ever had a connection to Canada’s favourite pastime (nearly everyone).
  3. Asylum seekers
    Canada experienced an influx of asylum seekers in 2018. Thousands of refugees crossed the Canadian border, coming from the United States, particularly in Quebec.
  4. Toronto attacks
    Toronto grappled with a mass shooting on June 22, when a gunman opened fire on Danforth Avenue, leaving two dead and 13 wounded. Previously, on April 23, a Toronto van-ramming attack left 10 pedestrians dead and 13 injured.
  5. Trump talks, Canada shudders
    U.S. President Donald Trump repeatedly threatened to withdraw from NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement that Canada and Mexico were also a part of. After much back-and-forth the three countries agreed to a new deal, along with a new treaty name — United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA — which doesn’t exactly roll off your tongue.
  6. Canada goes to pot
    On Oct. 17, cannabis became legal in Canada. What began as a campaign promise by Trudeau became a reality after much debate and scrambling by municipal and provincial jurisdictions over regulations and distribution. Despite supply setbacks and other quibbles, Canadians seemed to easily adapt to the new legal weed landscape.
  7. ‘Yellow vest’ rallies
    Having originated in France, “‘yellow vest” rallies popped up in Edmonton and across Canada in December. Numerous issues spurred protesters to don bright yellow safety vests and take to the streets in Edmonton. Chief complaints among the protesters related to the carbon tax, Trudeau and immigration.
    Source: edmontonjournal.com